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Is Creatine Natty? Debunking Gym Myths

Is Creatine Natty? Debunking Gym Myths

Posted by Leonard Shemtob on Sep 12, 2023

Let's jump right into one of the hottest questions popping around gyms and online forums: Is creatine natty?

"Natty" refers to being natural for those who aren't familiar with this gym-bro term.

So when someone asks, "is taking creatine natty?" they're basically asking if creatine is a naturally occurring substance or if it's some kind of performance-enhancing drug (PED) they should be wary of.


Short Summary:

  • Dive deep into the debate: "Is Creatine Natty?" in bodybuilding.
  • Explore the natural origins of creatine, often found in meat and fish.
  • Analyze the role of creatine phosphate in high-intensity activities.
  • Discover top 5 creatine supplements available now.
  • Understand the safety profile, benefits, and potential side effects of creatine.
  • Buy the Best Creatine Supplement and supercharge your muscle growth!

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Creatine: What's the Scoop?

Creatine is a naturally occurring compound found in our bodies.

Primarily stored in muscle cells, it's formed from amino acids.

Creatine phosphate, a form of creatine, plays a key role in producing energy during high intensity activities.

Think of it as a turbocharger for your muscles!

Did you know meat and fish are prime food sources of creatine?

So, if you've ever enjoyed a steak or a tuna sandwich, you've consumed some creatine without even realizing.


Top 5 Creatine Supplements

While our bodies produce creatine and we consume it from meat and fish, many athletes and bodybuilders turn to creatine supplementation to enhance their workouts.

Let's dissect some of the biggest players in this category:

Jetmass Creatine by GAT Sport

#1. JetMass by GAT

More than just a creatine supplement, it's an alchemical orchestra of elements tailored for the boldest warriors, champions, and titans. If you're seeking the ultimate creatine nirvana, your elixir awaits.

Key Benefits:

  • Provides 5 grams of Creapure Creatine Monohydrate per each serving
  • Contains amino acids and vitamins for additional muscle support
  • Helps increase muscle mass
  • Helps accelerate recovery
  • Helps enhance muscle energy and strength

Creatine Monohydrate by Bucked Up

#2. Creatine Monohydrate by Bucked Up

Unleash the beast within with Bucked Up's Creatine Monohydrate. Harnessing unparalleled purity, this supplement can help elevate your workout game.

Key Benefits:

  • Turbocharged muscle recovery
  • Rocket fueled muscle growth
  • High-powered performance during intense training sessions

Creatine by Psycho Pharma

#3. Creatine by Psycho Pharma

Enter the realm of extreme with Psycho Pharma's Creatine. This is not just another creatine supplement; it's a revolution, a challenge, a force that propels you into the stratosphere of fitness.

Key Benefits:

  • Accelerate muscle recovery and bounce back with a vengeance
  • Enhanced muscle energy and strength
  • Significant muscle growth support

Creatine Nitrate by Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals

#4. Creatine Nitrate by Hi-Tech Pharmaceuticals

Dive into the future of creatine supplements with Hi-Tech Pharma's Creatine Nitrate. Combining the raw power of creatine with the magic of nitrates, it's a supernova of pumps, strength, and energy just waiting to explode.

Key Benefits:

  • Ignite new strength gains
  • Experience a flood of muscle growth
  • Elevate nitric oxide production, taking muscle pumps to the max level

Creatine HCI by Serious Nutrition Solutions - 120 CapsCreatine HCI by SNS (Powder Form)

#5. Creatine HCI by SNS

Embark on a journey of raw power with Creatine HCI from SNS. This highly potent blend guarantees lightning-fast absorption, ensuring that every grain turns into pure muscle magic.

Key Benefits:

  • Enhance your muscle growth journey
  • Elevate endurance levels, pushing past barriers
  • Experience rapid absorption, feeling the surge almost instantly
  • Comes in capsules and powder form

Is Creatine a Performance Enhancing Drug (PED)?

Let's set the record straight: While creatine can increase strength and muscle mass, it's NOT categorized as a banned substance or PED in sports.

Natural bodybuilders can rest easy knowing their increased muscle growth from creatine supplementation is all good in the natty realm.


Safety Profile and Side Effects

Creatine has a strong safety profile. But like anything, overconsumption can lead to side effects, like digestive issues.

Stick to the suggested loading and maintenance phases below to help you avoid any issues.

Always consult with a health professional when in doubt.


Creatine Loading & Maintenance Phases

Loading Phase

During the initial stage of creatine supplementation, commonly known as the 'loading phase', it's recommended to consume about 15 to 20 grams of creatine over 5-7 days. Keeping yourself adequately hydrated during this period is crucial.

A daily intake of at least 3 liters of water assists in shuttling the creatine to your muscle cells, amplifying the supplement's effectiveness and warding off possible side effects.

Maintenance Phase

After the loading phase, it's time to shift gears and settle into a routine of 3-5 grams per day. However, the hydration game remains unchanged; ensuring a daily water consumption of at least 3 liters is essential.

Bear in mind, skimping on water while on creatine can diminish its benefits and even lead to issues like muscle cramps.


To Wrap Things Up

Creatine is as natural as the amino acids in our bodies and the meat and fish on our plates.

For those who may be wondering if creatine is considered "natty," the answer is a resounding YES.

Whether you're boosting your workouts or just curious, knowing about creatine's natural origin and its benefits can help you make informed choices.


Written and Sponsored by Leonard Shemtob

Leonard Shemtob is President of Strong Supplements. Leonard has been in the supplement space for over 20 years, specializing in fitness supplements and nutrition. Leonard has written over 100 articles about supplements and has studied nutrition, supplementation and bodybuilding. 

Leonard's articles have been published in many top publications around the web. Leonard enjoys weight training, playing basketball and yoga, and also enjoys hiking. In his free time he studies and works on improving himself. His personal blog is www.leonardshemtob.com

FAQs

Are you still considered to be a natural athlete if you take creatine?

  • Yes! Creatine is a naturally occurring substance in our bodies and can naturally be found in foods like meat and fish.

Is creatine considered to be a banned substance?

  • No, creatine is not a banned substance and is not considered a performance enhancing drug (PED) in sports. If you are a tested athlete, it would be wise to check with your regulatory agency before using creatine.

What are some natural food sources of creatine?

  • Meat and fish are prime food sources for creatine.

Can creatine increase muscle mass?

  • Yes, with consistent training, creatine supplementation can lead to increased muscle growth.

References:

  1. Kreider, R.B. (2003). Effects of creatine supplementation on performance and training adaptations. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 244(1-2), 89-94.
  2. Buford, T.W., Kreider, R.B., Stout, J.R., et al. (2007). International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: Creatine supplementation and exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 4, 6.
  3. Rawson, E.S., & Venezia, A.C. (2011). Use of creatine in the elderly and evidence for effects on cognitive function in young and old. Amino Acids, 40(5), 1349-1362.
  4. Hultman, E., Söderlund, K., Timmons, J.A., Cederblad, G., & Greenhaff, P.L. (1996). Muscle creatine loading in men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 81(1), 232-237.
  5. Persky, A.M., & Brazeau, G.A. (2001). Clinical pharmacology of the dietary supplement creatine monohydrate. Pharmacological Reviews, 53(2), 161-176.
  6. Cooper, R., Naclerio, F., Allgrove, J., & Jimenez, A. (2012). Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 9(1), 33.

Creatine FAQs

Yes! Creatine is a naturally occurring substance in our bodies and can naturally be found in foods like meat and fish.
No, creatine is not a banned substance and is not considered a performance enhancing drug (PED) in sports. If you are a tested athlete, it would be wise to check with your regulatory agency before using creatine.
Meat and fish are prime food sources for creatine.
Yes, with consistent training, creatine supplementation can lead to increased muscle growth.

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